More Print Celebration!

Dear Liza,

I was happy to see so many people visiting SideStreet Arts Gallery for the print celebration!

Art loving crowds!

There were so many great print artists at SideStreet Arts, I didn’t to visit with them all. But I have taken some photos and done some research, and can tell you about them.

From Mt. Tabor by Jessica Hartman
Jessica Hartman and her mixed media strappo prints

Jessica Hartman , who displayed these intriguing multi-layered prints, been an artist for many years. She did print making for years, then took a break, and found that when she returned to it her work was much different. This makes sense to me. Art comes from who you are at a given moment, and we change, minute to minute. So of course your work would change.

Kristen Etmond

Kristen Etmond is a print artist from Olympia, Washington, whose delicate, colorful work is just as sweet as she is. I got to visit with her, and her soft spoken ways are perfectly reflected in her work. Mostly borrowed from nature, her images whisper rather than holler.


Kristen Etmond’s whispering prints

Kristy Lombard is a ceramicist who is also a print artist. She creates the textures on her “wall pillows” by pressing slabs of clay into linoleum sheets she has carved with intricate patterns. Then she adds the delightful details, like ship’s portholes, and shapes the clay into “pillows”. I love the practicality of a three dimensional artwork you can hang on the wall!

Kristy Lombard’s wall pillow

While I was walking around the gallery, I got to see this fellow buy the last of Elizabeth Wocasek‘s standing crows. He said he even had a place picked out for it, beside his fireplace. I am sure they will be very happy together.

Happy new crow owner

Such a wonderful, exhausting, artful day!


Love,

Grandma Judy

Gail Owen, Print Artist

Dear Liza,

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Gail Owen and her Flying Hearts

One of the artists that is showing at SideStreet Arts along with Auntie Bridgett is Gail Owen. Gail had her home studio open Saturday as part of Portland Open Studio Tour, and we went by to visit. I always love to see how artists make their magic, and print making, with its steps which must happen in reverse, has always fascinated me.

Gail came to print making after a career in aerospace, working for the Boeing Corporation. We talked about the different aircraft plants in California. My dad worked for Douglas Aircraft for many years and she had almost worked at ‘his’ Long Beach plant. Finding commonality with new people is always a treat. Her experience with parts and engineering gave her a leg-up on printmaking, she said. It made sense to her.

A self-taught printer, Gail began with small format prints with just a few colors, and worked her way up to much larger pieces, some of which are two by three feet. These larger pieces are made up of sections, each one designed and printed on its own and then sewn together, matted, and framed. The accuracy needed at every stage is amazing and intimidating.

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Onion by Gail Owen

Gail walked us through her process, which starts with taking black and white photos of flowers in her neighborhood. Then she chooses her color palette, working with up to eight colors on one print. She cuts into linoleum sheets to make her pattern, cutting away each section as she gets it the way she likes it. Once she is finished, that piece of linoleum is a mess, with sections gouged away, and can never be used again.

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Hollyhocks by Gail Owen

When Gail only wants to use a few colors, or make many more prints, she uses a process where she has different stamps for each color. Each stamp has only the part of the picture that will be in that color. This process makes more sense to me, but is still incredibly precise.

 

Gail also uses her printing to decorate wooden toys worked with strings, such as her Flying Hearts and Climbing Bears. There is a simplicity and whimsy in all her work which is very endearing.

I am grateful that Gail took the time to show us her art and her process, and happy that I get to see her work at SideStreet Arts!

Love,

Grandma Judy